About Amir

Amir Hekmati was born in Flagstaff, Arizona and grew up in Flint, Michigan. He has an older sister and a twin sister. His father is a college professor and his mother is a tax professional.

Amir loves travelling, being physically active and learning languages, he is fluent in Farsi, Arabic and English. He plays soccer, hockey and enjoys martial arts, boxing and running. He graduated with honors from Monterey Peninsula College as an Arabic Linguist and from the University of Phoenix with a degree in Global Business Management. Before visiting Iran he worked as a research consultant and was set to pursue a degree from the University of Michigan in Economics on his return from Iran in the Fall.

Amir is a wonderful and peaceful person who enjoys reading, poetry, sports, learning about and experiencing different cultures. He has provided numerous trainings to Americans on Arab and Islamic Culture in order to facilitate awareness and break stereotypes and misunderstandings of these groups in the US. He has spent much of his career promoting positive relationships between America and the Middle East. He always tried his best to succeed at whatever he did. He is an entrepreneur in many forms. In 2006 he founded his own company Lucid Linguistics LLC, a professional consulting service that provided linguistic services from English to Arabic and English to Farsi. He has won awards for his leadership and academic excellence. He has a very big heart and loves being generous to his family and friends. He is an Uncle of a two year old niece and four year old nephew.

He has also assisted in numerous humanitarian efforts abroad such as reconstructing schools and roads. He served as an infantryman, senior language and cultural advisor and an Arabic and Persian Linguist in the US Marine Corps from 2001 to 2005. He served in Operation Iraqi Freedom from 2003 – 2004 and was awarded the Combat Action Ribbon and Good Conduct Medal.


What happened?

Amir Hekmati, a former marine and decorated war veteran, was born in Arizona and raised in Michigan. Within weeks of setting foot in Iran for the first time in August 2011 to visit his grandmother, he was arrested, interrogated and imprisoned.  Months later he appeared on Iranian TV, forced to confess he was a CIA operative. The U.S. State Department denies he was spying for the U.S. government and calls the case a gross miscarriage of justice. While Amir languishes in prison, his health deteriorating, and his father dying of cancer, his family pleads with the Iranian government to let him go free.

Source: CNN